Innove-E Foundation

Innove-E Foundation

types of abuse

How would I know if I have traumatic brain injury from abuse?

March is Brain Injury Awareness Month. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) often goes unrecognized for survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV). There are many ways people are physically abused. There are usually no visible signs of TBI.

Here are a few questions to ask yourself:

  1. Have you ever been choked?
  2. Have you been placed in a sleeper hold?
  3. Have you been slammed against something?
  4. Have you had furniture or other objects thrown at you, hitting your head?
  5. Have you had your hair pulled, so hard that you fell to the ground?
  6. Have you been punched to the floor and then pulled across the floor by your legs or hair?
  7. Have you been hit with something hard, hit with a fist or slapped?
  8. Have you been karate chopped?
  9. Have you ever been body slammed?
  10. Have you ever been kicked?
  11. Have you been picked up and thrown?
  12. Have you been shaken?
  13. Has this abuse happened more than once?
  14. Did you lose consciousness?
  15. Have you been checked for brain injury?

There is a higher risk for permanent damage when these types of physical abuse happens more than once. Many times traumatic brain injury (TBI) from domestic violence goes unreported, resulting in brain injury symptoms that can last a lifetime.

I am a TBI domestic violence survivor. I have not had agencies discuss traumatic brain injury with me. I mentioned it to them and they said, “Oh, you have PTSD from all the years of intimate partner violence.”

Here are some of the symptoms that I had:

  1. Loss of consciousness
  2. Balance issues/dizziness
  3. Headaches
  4. Memory issues
  5. Mood issues
  6. Problems with reading, writing and numbers
  7. Slurred speech
  8. Fatigue
  9. Sleep issues
  10. Nausea, vomiting

I knew I needed help and that all my symptoms were not just PTSD. As an outpatient of a brain injury rehabilitation facility, I completed cognitive, behavioral & emotional programs as well as speech and vision therapy.  

Here is a link to learn more TBI symptoms: https://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/tbi/conditioninfo/symptoms

This blog is to alert domestic violence survivors to seek medical help for possible traumatic brain injury and for agencies to implement programs to screen for TBI, if you have not done so already. 

*”Domestic violence (DV) is a common cause of brain injury in women, who constitute the vast majority of victims of severe physical violence by an intimate partner. 

Domestic violence service providers.

Screen everyone who seeks DV services for TBI. A brief screening tool that was designed to be used by professionals who are not TBI experts is the HELPS.2

HELPS is an acronym for the most important questions to ask:

H = Were you hit in the head?

E = Did you seek emergency room treatment?

L = Did you lose consciousness? (Not everyone who suffers a TBI loses consciousness.)

P = Are you having problems with concentration and memory?

S = Did you experience sickness or other physical problems following the injury?

If you suspect a victim has a brain injury, or they answer “yes” to any of these questions, help them get an evaluation by a medical or neuropsychological professional – especially if they have suffered repeated brain injuries, which may decrease their ability to recover and increase their risk of death. If the victim wishes, reach out to the TBI service provider with information about DV, what support they need, and what services are available to them. Look for ways to work together.”* *https://www.opdv.ny.gov/professionals/tbi/dvandtbi_infoguide.html

Stalking

 

 

Stalking is defined as: harass or persecute (someone) with unwanted and obsessive attention; move silently or threateningly through (a place)

Some signs of stalking are:

  1. Follows you as you travel
  2. Sends you unwanted text messages, cards, and emails.
  3. Sends you unwanted gifts, like flowers.
  4. Uses social media/GPS to track you.
  5. Constantly calls you and hangs up; or leaves voicemails.
  6. Appears in places, they should not be; waiting outside of your employment, church, house.

Stalkers control their victims, try to trap them and become threatening in many ways.

Your school life, work, social life, and daily functions are affected.

There is always a fear of what might happen should the stalker find you.

The feeling of being hunted can cripple you.

Stalking is illegal in every state.

Get the police involved and make sure to find out their jurisdiction. You may have to involve multiple locations.

Victim advocates are very helpful. They can provide assistance with safety issues.

Always know it is not your fault. You did not cause this person to become a stalker.

You may have to relocate, as I did. A restraining order did not stop my abuser/stalker.

My stalker appeared where he was not supposed to be. I was a confident, strong woman who became fearful of shopping, going to church, in fear of answering the door and spent many sleepless nights wondering if my stalker was outside. I alerted people ahead of time of where I was going so they could be on the lookout for my stalker.

I always was looking around everywhere I went, even when driving until I went into hiding.

I am still very cautious when answering the door after relocating. I have heard of stalkers finding their victims years later, so I stay alert to my surroundings.

You can feel panic at any time, even years later. Telling my story encourages and strengthens me, knowing that I can help others. I know that God is protecting me wherever I go. Praying daily has helped me gain back my confidence.

Here are some ways to keep safe:

  1. Stop all communication with the stalker.
  2. Remove yourself from social media.
  3. Alert your friends, employer, and family members that you are being stalked.
  4. Change places you shop, routes you drive and times of your activities.
  5. Get some training in self-defense.
  6. Keep track of all interactions with your stalker, even if you do not think they mean anything. In the future, you may realize that minor incident was leading up to something major. Stalkingawareness.org has resources, such as a “Stalking Incident and Behavior Log”.
  7. Go to the local authorities.
  8. Get a protective/restraining order. The difference between protective and restraining orders is explained here: https://victimconnect.org/resources/protection-orders
  9. Become part of the address confidentiality program: http://victimsofcrime.org/our-programs/stalking-resource-center/help-for-victims/address-confidentiality-programs
  10. Take back your power.

Written by C.L. Valens; Advocate, Author and Speaker. “I am in hiding for Domestic Violence and Stalking. Relocation and a permanent restraining order have not stopped my abuser/stalker. The arrest cases were dropped for lack of evidence. After the last arrest and release, I asked the district attorney, ‘What will it take for you to stop him, for him to kill me?’ I got no response and stay alert to my surroundings every day.”