Innove-E Foundation

Innove-E Foundation

Mental Health

Help for Addictions

God grant me the Serenity to accept the things I cannot change; Courage to change the things I can; and the Wisdom to know the difference.

This prayer is part of 12 step programs. You can find peace and tranquility through repeating the serenity prayer.   

With people all over the world forced to stay at home because of Covid-19 there may be thoughts of ways to ease the stress, boredom, abuse, feelings of isolation, or fear. If you have had an addiction, this can be a very challenging time. One slip up can put you back into the addiction. If you feel that drugs, alcohol, or over-eating are taking over your life there is help.

Narcotics Anonymous offers recovery to addicts around the world.

https://na.org/

Alcoholics Anonymous offers recovery from alcoholism. 

https://aa.org/

Overeaters Anonymous is a program for people with problems related to food and overeating.  

https://oa.org/

There are groups for family members and friends of drug addicts and alcoholics. These are beneficial for people who do not know how to deal with addicted family or friends. It is very hard to see someone you love addicted.

Unfortunately, I know from firsthand experience the downfall of family members from addictions. You try to rescue them, which can take a toll on your own health. It is very hard to let them go. These groups can help you learn how to let the addict go, if or when that becomes necessary.

Nar-Anon Family Groups; A 12-Step Program for Family & Friends of Addicts

https://www.nar-anon.org/

Help and hope for families and friends of alcoholics

https://al-anon.org/

Please contact me if you would like to talk: [email protected]

How would I know if I have traumatic brain injury from abuse?

March is Brain Injury Awareness Month. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) often goes unrecognized for survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV). There are many ways people are physically abused. There are usually no visible signs of TBI.

Here are a few questions to ask yourself:

  1. Have you ever been choked?
  2. Have you been placed in a sleeper hold?
  3. Have you been slammed against something?
  4. Have you had furniture or other objects thrown at you, hitting your head?
  5. Have you had your hair pulled, so hard that you fell to the ground?
  6. Have you been punched to the floor and then pulled across the floor by your legs or hair?
  7. Have you been hit with something hard, hit with a fist or slapped?
  8. Have you been karate chopped?
  9. Have you ever been body slammed?
  10. Have you ever been kicked?
  11. Have you been picked up and thrown?
  12. Have you been shaken?
  13. Has this abuse happened more than once?
  14. Did you lose consciousness?
  15. Have you been checked for brain injury?

There is a higher risk for permanent damage when these types of physical abuse happens more than once. Many times traumatic brain injury (TBI) from domestic violence goes unreported, resulting in brain injury symptoms that can last a lifetime.

I am a TBI domestic violence survivor. I have not had agencies discuss traumatic brain injury with me. I mentioned it to them and they said, “Oh, you have PTSD from all the years of intimate partner violence.”

Here are some of the symptoms that I had:

  1. Loss of consciousness
  2. Balance issues/dizziness
  3. Headaches
  4. Memory issues
  5. Mood issues
  6. Problems with reading, writing and numbers
  7. Slurred speech
  8. Fatigue
  9. Sleep issues
  10. Nausea, vomiting

I knew I needed help and that all my symptoms were not just PTSD. As an outpatient of a brain injury rehabilitation facility, I completed cognitive, behavioral & emotional programs as well as speech and vision therapy.  

Here is a link to learn more TBI symptoms: https://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/tbi/conditioninfo/symptoms

This blog is to alert domestic violence survivors to seek medical help for possible traumatic brain injury and for agencies to implement programs to screen for TBI, if you have not done so already. 

*”Domestic violence (DV) is a common cause of brain injury in women, who constitute the vast majority of victims of severe physical violence by an intimate partner. 

Domestic violence service providers.

Screen everyone who seeks DV services for TBI. A brief screening tool that was designed to be used by professionals who are not TBI experts is the HELPS.2

HELPS is an acronym for the most important questions to ask:

H = Were you hit in the head?

E = Did you seek emergency room treatment?

L = Did you lose consciousness? (Not everyone who suffers a TBI loses consciousness.)

P = Are you having problems with concentration and memory?

S = Did you experience sickness or other physical problems following the injury?

If you suspect a victim has a brain injury, or they answer “yes” to any of these questions, help them get an evaluation by a medical or neuropsychological professional – especially if they have suffered repeated brain injuries, which may decrease their ability to recover and increase their risk of death. If the victim wishes, reach out to the TBI service provider with information about DV, what support they need, and what services are available to them. Look for ways to work together.”* *https://www.opdv.ny.gov/professionals/tbi/dvandtbi_infoguide.html

Mental Health and Domestic Violence

 

Feeling his hands around my neck saying, “I am going to kill you b….”, living in fear, knowing I might not see the next day! That is how I felt many years.  When I finally got away, I did not realize how scared I was of my abuser. Just the thought of him made me tremble to my inner core. Seeing him, made my legs so weak I could not walk.

Standing against a wall after getting a temporary restraining order, trying not to pass out, I realized that this was the end of my abuse and the beginning of a new life. I was making a statement that I would no longer tolerate abuse of any kind. I was scared, not knowing the next move, I realized that no matter what happened I had to get away and never look back. Appearing in court with him was more than my body and mind could handle. After the first arrest for stalking, with the restraining order in place, the court accepted my plea not to appear with my abuser in court again. For that, I am grateful.

May is Mental Health Awareness Month and that was a reminder for me to realize how much I have healed both mentally and physically. PTSD is something I will live with the rest of my life, but fortunately, I have learned ways to cope with it.  I found many ways to heal alternatively and I want to help others learn those ways and become survivors, leaving the victim mentally behind.

One way that was healing for me was to write, “Domestic Violence Survivor Handbook, Steps to Freedom“. If you are a victim of abuse and trying to find your way to freedom, please check out my book.